Posted in animal abuse, cats, dogs, guinea pig, pets, rabbits, shelter animals

Fame – at what price?

A British woman who threw a full-grown cat in a garbage bin recently didn’t know she was being taped by a surveillance camera. She’s now had more than her allotted 15 minutes of fame, and agonizing reasons to rue her actions.

She’s also facing charges of animal cruelty that might include jail time.

The owners of the cat had installed a video camera outside their home. When their cat went missing, they began searching for her. The 4-year-old feline, who reportedly had been in the bin for 15 hours, fortunately hadn’t lost her meow. When her owners heard her cries, they followed the sound to their garbage can, a large receptacle fitted with a heavy lid. Their pet cat, Lola, was apparently unharmed by her stint in the plastic bin, but no one knows for certain what might have happened if Lola hadn’t been retrieved from her confinement.

The cat’s owners posted the surveillance video of the incident on the social networking website Facebook.com, hoping to identify the woman in the video. It resulted in a worldwide furor about the woman’s actions.

It’s unknown what the culprit was thinking. She has since apologized and stated that she meant no harm to the cat, and that a malicious act was out of character for her.

What’s startling is the reaction to the woman’s misdeed. The suggestions of what should happen to the woman have been striking in their malevolence.

Not to discount what was done to the cat, but you would think we were living in Mesopotamia in Hamurabi’s time. There’s no denying the woman’s guilt. The Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (RSPCA) is said to be considering the matter and will hopefully reach a conclusion soon.

Meanwhile the woman has been offered police protection in case any of the public’s death threats are more than idle chatter.

The important question we should all be asking is: “Do I know how to recognize and report animal cruelty?”

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Owned by three cats over age 13